Interview With Paul And Rachel Chandler: British Couple Taken Hostage By Somali Pirates (1)

Nearly two years after being released by Somali pirates who stormed their sailboat and held them hostage for 13 months, Paul and Rachel Chandler are finally ready to get back on their boat, the Lynn Rival. This time they won't be going anywhere near Somalia, but they refuse to rule out a return visit if the situation there improves.

Nearly two years after being released by Somali pirates who stormed their sailboat and held them hostage for 13 months, Paul and Rachel Chandler are finally ready to get back on their boat, the Lynn Rival. This time they won't be going anywhere near Somalia, but they refuse to rule out a return visit if the situation there improves.
The Chandlers have spent much of the last two years writing a book, "Hostage, A Year At Gunpoint with Somali Pirates," and getting their boat, which was salvaged by the British Navy, ready to sail again. In a wide-ranging interview, we spoke to the Chandlers about their ordeal, how they feel about their captors, what they learned from the experience and why they want to continue living on their boat.

Where do you live now?
PAUL: We live on the Lynn Rival, our boat; we're home at last. We don't have a home on land in Britain at the moment. We have a flat in Kent, but we have tenants, and maybe when we finish voyaging, we'll settle down there.
And what were you doing before you were taken hostage?
PAUL: I'm a consulting engineer; I'm now 62. Rachel is an economist; she's 57. I had an engineering practice that I sold and Rachel was working for the government as an economist and that enabled us in 2005 to sail for half the year and work half the year.

How did you pull that off?
PAUL: If you're good enough, they don't want to lose you. Rachel's superiors gave her six months off, so we traveled half the year in '05 and '06, and then we decided we wanted to sail year round and live on the boat.
In 2007, we set off around the Red Sea, across the Arabian Sea to India, cruised the coast of India and we enjoyed it enough to make it worth doing permanently, so we rented our flat out and planned on sailing full time. We wanted to see the western part of the Indian Ocean, Zanzibar, Dar es Salaam and Madagascar. Somalia wasn't on our list.
We planned to sail from the Seychelles to Tanzania, and if it hadn't been for that fateful evening we would have gone down to Madagascar, but that's where it all went a bit awry.

It sounds like you found a way to escape the rat race before it all went south?
PAUL: Absolutely we did. When I turned 45, we decided that we'd go sailing when I turned 55 because we knew a lot of people who left it until they got too old and I didn't want that to happen to us. So we worked very hard for those ten years to make this happen.
If you say, 'I'll just work another year and save another $5,000,' you'll never get around to doing it. You've got to go. We figured out that if we could do without all mod cons, we could sail and live for less than we'd spend on land. We've had friends who have died young of cancer, so we thought we had to take the chance while we could.
Take us back to the night you were taken hostage. Where were you?
PAUL: We were halfway between this ring of islands on the outer edge of the Seychelles and the main islands, perhaps 60 miles from the main islands of the Seychelles, not far from where Prince William and Kate went for their honeymoon. We were almost 900 miles from Somalia when we were taken hostage.
Were you aware of the danger of being even that close to Somalia?
PAUL: Of course we were. We'd sailed through the Gulf of Aden two years before. We did our research pretty well. We knew we were right on the fringes. There have been attacks as far as 1,500 miles away from Somalia. Official warning distance was about 200-300 miles off the coast of Somalia.
We thought it was an acceptable risk. There are worse risks you take at sea every day. It's absolute nonsense when people say we were warned and we shouldn't have been there. That's with the benefit of hindsight. We went to four authorities in our checkout procedure and they all said, 'Have a good voyage.'

And the pirates stormed the boat in the middle of the night?
PAUL: It was 2:30 in the morning, so I was asleep until I heard the gunshots. Rachel was standing watch.
RACHEL: I heard an engine in the distance and then I saw a boat with no lights approaching us very fast. I knew that it didn't look good, so I shined a light on them and they responded with two gunshots.
I was in disbelief – my mind was racing. I knew we couldn't outrun them. Our little auxiliary engine can only get to about six knots and they were coming at us at about 20 knots. They slammed into the side of the boat and I could see four men with guns, they were grabbing our handrails and shouting as they climbed onto the boat. Then another boat approached from the port side and another four men clambered on board. I was in a state of absolute shock.
They were sort of struggling to get on the boat and pointing a gun at me all the while. Paul had to struggle to put in his contact lenses and come up to find out what was going on. Eventually a bigger, open boat came with two more men on it. One of them was called Buggaf; he was their leader. He was a very nasty piece of work – very threatening.

Did you know immediately that you were being taken hostage?
RACHEL: We knew we'd be robbed, but we thought they'd go away in search of a bigger ship. We never envisioned that we'd be taken hostage, especially so far from Somalia. They could see that we had a small boat and probably weren't likely to be able to pay a big ransom but they didn't see it like that. Buggaf told us to set a course and steer towards Somalia.

And your boat was abandoned off the coast of Somalia?
RACHEL: Yes, we were towing their boats and our engine couldn't cope. At that point they realized that the value was in us two and not our boat, so it was abandoned.

*To be continued next week